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Definition of Verbum

Verbum Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
JM Latin-English Dictionary
word; proverb; [verba dare alicui => cheat/deceive someone]
Latin-English Online Dictionary
Verbum Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Verbum may refer to:
  • Word, the smallest element that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content
  • Verb, from the Latin verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action or a state of being
  • Logos, an important term in philosophy, psychology, rhetoric, and religion
  • Dei Verbum, one of the principal documents of the Second Vatican Council
  • Verbum (magazine), an early personal computer and computer art magazine focusing on interactive art and computer graphics
  • A 1942 lithograph entitled Verbum by M. C. Escher
  • A version of Logos Bible Software designed to help Catholics to study Scripture and understand Church Tradition

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Verbum Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Verbum (Latin) Word; adopted by later Latin-speaking philosophers and Christian theologians to represent the cosmic Logos (word), often used in the more concrete sense as the spoken word in reference to the vibratory power of sound; or in its application to Christos in theology.
Whether the Greek logos or Latin verbum is used, the philosophical meaning is the same and arose from the fact that a word is the audible expression of the inner, ever-active but silent idea. Hence cosmic spirit, the field of cosmic ideation, by its very activity of producing cosmic thought manifests itself as the word -- or words. A person has a thought to which he gives utterance as a word; similarly the cosmic Logos was metaphorically spoken of in Greek philosophy, especially by the Platonists, as the cosmic Word of the secret idea or thought of the cosmic intelligence. Parallel also to the Hindu Vach.