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Definition of Thunder

Babylon English

make a roaring sound
booming sound in the air created during stormy weather
Thunder Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(v. t.)
To emit with noise and terror; to utter vehemently; to publish, as a threat or denunciation.
  
(n.)
To utter violent denunciation.
  
(n.)
To produce thunder; to sound, rattle, or roar, as a discharge of atmospheric electricity; -- often used impersonally; as, it thundered continuously.
  
(n.)
The sound which follows a flash of lightning; the report of a discharge of atmospheric electricity.
  
(n.)
The discharge of electricity; a thunderbolt.
  
(n.)
Fig.: To make a loud noise; esp. a heavy sound, of some continuance.
  
(n.)
Any loud noise; as, the thunder of cannon.
  
(n.)
An alarming or statrling threat or denunciation.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

thunder
\thun"der\ (?), n. [oe. ?under, ?onder, ?oner, as. ?unor; akin to ?unian to stretch, to thunder, d. donder thunder, g. donner, ohg. donar, icel. ?ōrr thor, l. tonare to thunder, tonitrus thunder, gr. to`nos a stretching, straining, skr. tan to stretch. ?52. see thin, and cf. astonish, detonate, intone, thursday, tone.]
1. the sound which follows a flash of lightning; the report of a discharge of atmospheric electricity.
2. the discharge of electricity; a thunderbolt. [obs.] the revenging gods 'gainst parricides did all their thunders bend.
3. any loud noise; as, the thunder of cannon.
4. an alarming or statrling threat or denunciation. the thunders of the vatican could no longer strike into the heart of princes.
thunder
pumper. (zo?l.) (a) the croaker (haploidontus grunniens). (b) the american bittern or stake-driver.
thunder
rod, a lightning rod. [r.]
thunder
snake. (zo?l.) (a) the chicken, or milk, snake. (b) a small reddish ground snake (carphophis, or celuta, amœna) native to the eastern united states; -- called also worm snake.
thunder
tube, a fulgurite. see fulgurite.
thunder
\thun"der\ (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. thundered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. thundering.] [as. ?unrian. see thunder, n.] 1. to produce thunder; to sound, rattle, or roar, as a discharge of atmospheric electricity; -- often used impersonally; as, it thundered continuously. canst thou thunder with a voice like him? 9.
2. fig.: to make a loud noise; esp. a heavy sound, of some continuance. his dreadful voice no more would thunder in my ears.
3. to utter violent denunciation.
thunder
\thun"der\, v. t. to emit with noise and terror; to utter vehemently; to publish, as a threat or denunciation. oracles severe were daily thundered in our general's ear. an archdeacon, as being a prelate, may thunder out an ecclesiastical censure.
thunder
n
1. a deep prolonged loud noise [syn: boom, roar, roaring]


2. a booming or crashing noise caused by air expanding along the path of a bolt of lightning v 1: move fast, noisily, and heavily; "the bus thundered down the road" 2: utter words loudly and forcefully; "`get out of here,' he roared." [syn: roar]


3. be the case that thunder is being heard; "whenever it thunders, my dog crawls under the bed." [syn: boom]


4. to make or produce a loud noise; "the river thundered below"; "the engine roared as the driver pushed the car to full throttle."
thunder
often referred to in scripture (job 40:9; ps. 77:18; 104:7). james and john were called by our lord "sons of thunder" (mark 3:17). in job 39:19, instead of "thunder," as in the authorized version, the revised version translates (ra'amah) by "quivering main" (marg., "shaking"). thunder accompanied the giving of the law at sinai (ex. 19:16). it was regarded as the voice of god (job 37:2; ps. 18:13; 81:7; comp. john 12:29). in answer to samuel's prayer (1 sam. 12:17, 18), god sent thunder, and "all the people greatly feared," for at such a season (the wheat-harvest) thunder and rain were almost unknown in palestine.

Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
tóirneach f.
English Phonetics

www.interactiveselfstudy.com
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Dreigio = v. to lighten at a distance without thunder
Marchdaran = n. a loud thunder clap
Taran = n. shock; thunder
Taranu = v. to thunder
Australian Slang
a train
toilet
person with large, fat legs
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a deep prolonged loud noise
(synonym) boom, roar, roaring
(hypernym) noise
2. a booming or crashing noise caused by air expanding along the path of a bolt of lightning
(hypernym) noise
(hyponym) thunderclap
(derivation) boom
3. street names for heroin
(synonym) big H, hell dust, nose drops, smack
(hypernym) heroin, diacetylmorphine

Verb
1. move fast, noisily, and heavily; "The bus thundered down the road"
(hypernym) move
(derivation) boom, roar, roaring
2. utter words loudly and forcefully; "`Get out of here,' he roared"
(synonym) roar
(hypernym) shout
(derivation) boom, roar, roaring
3. be the case that thunder is being heard; "Whenever it thunders, my dog crawls under the bed"
(synonym) boom
(entail) storm
4. to make or produce a loud noise; "The river thundered below"; "The engine roared as the driver pushed the car to full throttle"
(hypernym) roar, howl
(derivation) boom, roar, roaring
Thunder Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
Company Info: Ticker, Name, Description
THUNDER MOUNTAIN GOLD INC
Exchange: OTCBB
Not Available
Thunder Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
Phobia
Fear of thunder and lightning
Also known as
Fear of thunder
Fear of thunder and lightning
Dream Dictionary
To dream of hearing thunder, foretells you will soon be threatened with reverses in your business. To be in a thunder shower, denotes trouble and grief are close to you. To hear the terrific peals of thunder, which make the earth quake, portends great loss and disappointment.
  
Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or "What's in a dream": a scientific and practical exposition; By Gustavus Hindman, 1910. For the open domain e-text see: Guttenberg Project
Dream Symbols
Emotions
Thunder Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
WEATHER&METEOROLOGY
The sound emitted by rapidly expanding gases along the channel of a lightning discharge. Over three-quarters of lightning's electrical discharge is used in heating the gases in the atmosphere in and immediately around the visible channel. Temperatures can rise to over 10,000 °C in microseconds, resulting in a violent pressure wave, composed of compression and rarefaction. The rumble of thunder is created as one's ear catches other parts of the discharge, the part of the lightning flash nearest registering first, then the parts further away.
Thunder Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Thunder is the sound caused by lightning. Depending on the distance and nature of the lightning, thunder can range from a sharp, loud crack to a long, low rumble (brontide). The sudden increase in pressure and temperature from lightning produces rapid expansion of the air surrounding and within a bolt of lightning. In turn, this expansion of air creates a sonic shock wave, similar to a sonic boom, which produces the sound of thunder, often referred to as a clap, crack, or peal of thunder. The distance of the lightning can be calculated by the listener based on the time interval from when the lightning is seen to when the sound is heard.

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Thunder Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
Environmental Engineering (English ver.)
The crashing or booming sound produced by rapidly expanding air along the path of the electrical discharge of lightning.
Thunder Definition from Entertainment & Music Dictionaries & Glossaries
English to Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan
rahm
Thunder Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
often referred to in Scripture (Job 40:9; Ps. 77:18; 104:7). James and John were called by our Lord "sons of thunder" (Mark 3:17). In Job 39:19, instead of "thunder," as in the Authorized Version, the Revised Version translates (ra'amah) by "quivering main" (marg., "shaking"). Thunder accompanied the giving of the law at Sinai (Ex. 19:16). It was regarded as the voice of God (Job 37:2; Ps. 18:13; 81:7; comp. John 12:29). In answer to Samuel's prayer (1 Sam. 12:17, 18), God sent thunder, and "all the people greatly feared," for at such a season (the wheat-harvest) thunder and rain were almost unknown in Palestine.
Smith's Bible Dictionary

is hardly ever heard in Palestine form the middle of April to the middle of September; hence it was selected by Samuel as a striking expression of the divine displeasure toward the Israelites. (1 Samuel 12:17) Rain in harvest was deemed as extraordinary as snow in summer, (Proverbs 26:1) and Jerome states that he had never witnessed it in the latter part of June or in July. Comm. on (Amos 4:7) In the imaginative philosophy of the Hebrews, thunder was regarded as the voice of Jehovah, (Job 37:2,4,5; 40:9; Psalms 18:13; 29:3-9; Isaiah 30:30,31) who dwelt behind the thunder-cloud. (Psalms 81:7) Thunder was, to the mind of the Jew, the symbol of divine power (Psalms 29:3) etc., and vengeance. (1 Samuel 2:10; 2 Samuel 22:14)
  
Smith's Bible Dictionary (1884) , by William Smith. About
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
thunder, or in vain
  
greatness; thunder; some sort of evil
  
thunder, or evil, from the Lord
  
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (1869) , by Roswell D. Hitchcock. About
Rakefet
Thunder Sometimes called the voice of God, as used frequently in the Old Testament and the Apocalypse. With the Romans it was popularly considered a manifestation of Jupiter Tonans -- hence the name thundering Jupiter. Apart from its physical relations, and as one of the phenomena of sound, it may be considered a manifestation of the fifth cosmic element, akasa, whence sound is born, it being understood that what our ears feel as sound is a sense interpretation to us of vibrational effects. Science appears to identify sound per se with the merely vibrational effects which accompany it or are caused by it, or even at times evoke it.