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Definition of Surplus

Babylon English

more than is needed, extra, excess, superfluous
amount in excess of what is needed; excess of assets over liabilities (Accounting)
Surplus Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
That which remains when use or need is satisfied, or when a limit is reached; excess; overplus.
  
(n.)
Specifically, an amount in the public treasury at any time greater than is required for the ordinary purposes of the government.
  
(a.)
Being or constituting a surplus; more than sufficient; as, surplus revenues; surplus population; surplus words.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

surplus
\sur"plus\ (?), n. [f., fr. sur over + plus more. see sur-, and plus, and cf. superplus.]
1. that which remains when use or need is satisfied, or when a limit is reached; excess; overplus.
2. specifically, an amount in the public treasury at any time greater than is required for the ordinary purposes of the government.
surplus
\sur"plus\, a. being or constituting a surplus; more than sufficient; as, surplus revenues; surplus population; surplus words. when the price of corn falleth, men give over surplus tillage, and break no more ground. arew.
surplus
adj : more than is needed, desired, or required; "trying to lose excess weight"; "found some extra change lying on the dresser"; "yet another book on heraldry might be thought redundant"; "skills made redundant by technological advance"; "sleeping in the spare room"; "supernumerary ornamentation"; "it was supererogatory of her to gloat"; "delete superfluous (or unnecessary) words"; "extra ribs as well as other supernumerary internal parts"; "surplus cheese distributed to the needy" [syn: excess, extra, redundant, spare, supererogatory, superfluous, supernumerary]
n : a quantity much larger than is needed [syn: excess, surplusage]





  similar words(1) 



 producer`s surplus 
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Gwarged = n. a surplus; orts
Gweilw = n. a spare, a surplus
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a quantity much larger than is needed
(synonym) excess, surplusage, nimiety
(hypernym) overabundance, overmuch, overmuchness, superabundance

Adjective
1. more than is needed, desired, or required; "trying to lose excess weight"; "found some extra change lying on the dresser"; "yet another book on heraldry might be thought redundant"; "skills made redundant by technological advance"; "sleeping in the spare room"; "supernumerary ornamentation"; "it was supererogatory of her to gloat"; "delete superfluous (or unnecessary) words"; "extra ribs as well as other supernumerary internal parts"; "surplus cheese distributed to the needy"
(synonym) excess, extra, redundant, spare, supererogatory, superfluous, supernumerary
(similar) unnecessary, unneeded
Surplus Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
BTS Transportation Expressions
Any excess personal property not required for the needs and the discharge of the responsibilities of any Federal agency, as determined by the Administrator of General Services. (GSA2)
By the Bureau of Transportation Statistics.
Campbell R. Harvey's Hypertextual Finance Glossary
Cash flow available after payment of taxes in the project.
Related: asset management
Copyright © 2000, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
Surplus Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
Environmental Economics Glossary
A term used when the quantity of a good supplied exceeds the quantity demanded at the existing price.
Surplus Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
Energy Glossary
(Electric utility) - Excess firm energy available from a utility or region for which there is no market at the established rates.
Surplus Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Surplus is when there is an excess supply of a product. Prices are driven down by surpluses.

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