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Definition of Penny

Babylon English Dictionary

coin of low value; British coin of low value; coin worth one cent (used in USA and Canada); fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the U.K.
Penny Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
See Denarius.
  
(n.)
Money, in general; as, to turn an honest penny.
  
(n.)
Any small sum or coin; a groat; a stiver.
  
(n.)
An English coin, formerly of copper, now of bronze, the twelfth part of an English shilling in account value, and equal to four farthings, or about two cents; -- usually indicated by the abbreviation d. (the initial of denarius).
  
(a.)
Worth or costing one penny.
  
(a.)
Denoting pound weight for one thousand; -- used in combination, with respect to nails; as, tenpenny nails, nails of which one thousand weight ten pounds.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

penny
cress (bot.), an annual herb of the mustard family, having round, flat pods like silver pennies (thlaspi arvense). prior...
see penny


  similar words(24) 



 penny father 
 to turn a penny 
 gripe penny 
 penny cress 
 penny dog 
 spend a penny 
 luck penny 
 turn a nice penny 
 ward penny 
 arles penny 
 penny-pinching 
 tin penny 
 warping penny 
 true-penny 
 two-a-penny 
 third-penny 
 god`s penny 
 to turn an honest penny 
 rome penny 
 penny wise 
 penny grass 
 penny post 
 drink penny 
 get-penny 
The Phrase Finder
Meaning
Go to the toilet.
Origin
In England public toilets used to have coin (penny) operated locks. Hence the graffiti 'Here I sit broken hearted, Paid a penny and only farted'.
Meaning
A realisation after a period of confusion or misunderstanding.
Origin
May have originated as a reference to the use of coin (penny) operated slots on the locks or public toilets.
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Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
pingin(n) (in Munster), pighinn
English Phonetics

www.interactiveselfstudy.com
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Ceiniog = stamped coin; a penny
Australian Slang
never had a penny
a town
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
(hypernym) fractional monetary unit, subunit
(part-holonym) Irish pound, Irish punt, punt, pound
2. a coin worth one-hundredth of the value of the basic unit
(synonym) cent, centime
(hypernym) coin
(hyponym) copper
Penny Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
Dream Dictionary
To dream of pennies, denotes unsatisfactory pursuits. Business will suffer, and lovers and friends will complain of the smallness of affection.

To lose them, signifies small deference and failures.

To find them, denotes that prospects will advance to your improvement.

To count pennies, foretells that you will be business-like and economical.
  
Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or "What's in a dream": a scientific and practical exposition; By Gustavus Hindman, 1910. For the open domain e-text see: Guttenberg Project
The Knighthood, Chivalry & Tournaments Arms and Armour Glossary
Silver coin first introduced into England during the 8th century, gradually reduced in size as larger coins were required.
Penny Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
A penny is a coin (pl. pennies) or a unit of currency  (pl. pence) used in several English-speaking countries. It is often the smallest denomination within a currency system.

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Penny Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
(Gr. denarion), a silver coin of the value of about 7 1/2d. or 8d. of our present money. It is thus rendered in the New Testament, and is more frequently mentioned than any other coin (Matt. 18:28; 20:2, 9, 13; Mark 6:37; 14:5, etc.). It was the daily pay of a Roman soldier in the time of Christ. In the reign of Edward III. an English penny was a labourer's day's wages. This was the "tribute money" with reference to which our Lord said, "Whose image and superscription is this?" When they answered, "Caesar's," he replied, "Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar's; and to God the things that are God's" (Matt. 22:19; Mark 12:15).