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Definition of Myosin

Babylon English Dictionary

commonest protein which constitutes the muscles and facilitates muscle contraction (Medicine)
Myosin Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
An albuminous body present in dead muscle, being formed in the process of coagulation which takes place in rigor mortis; the clot formed in the coagulation of muscle plasma. See Muscle plasma, under Plasma.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
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myosin
\my"o*sin\ (?), n. [gr. &?;, a muscle.] (physiol. chem.) an albuminous body present in dead muscle, being formed in the process of coagulation which takes place in rigor mortis; the clot formed in the coagulation of muscle plasma. see muscle plasma, under plasma.
note: myosin belongs to the group of globulins. it is insoluble in water, but soluble in dilute solution of salt, and is especially characterized by being completely precipitated by saturation of its solutions with salt.

WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. the commonest protein in muscle; a globulin that combines with actin to form actomyosin
(hypernym) globulin
(substance-holonym) actomyosin
Myosin Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
BioProcess International™ Glossary
a protein contained in striated muscle responsible for contraction; slides along filaments of actin, generating force using ATP as its energy source.
Copyright © 2002 - 2006, BioProcess International™. All rights reserved.
Myosin Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Myosins comprise a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins and are best known for their role in muscle contraction and their involvement in a wide range of other eukaryotic motility processes. They are responsible for actin-based motility. The term was originally used to describe a group of similar ATPases found in striated and smooth muscle cells. Following the discovery by Pollard and Korn of enzymes with myosin-like function in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a large number of divergent myosin genes have been discovered throughout eukaryotes. Thus, although myosin was originally thought to be restricted to muscle cells (hence, "myo"), there is no single "myosin" but rather a huge superfamily of genes whose protein products share the basic properties of actin binding, ATP hydrolysis (ATPase enzyme activity), and force transduction. Virtually all eukaryotic cells contain myosin isoforms. Some isoforms have specialized functions in certain cell types (such as muscle), while other isoforms are ubiquitous. The structure and function of myosin is strongly conserved across species, to the extent that rabbit muscle myosin II will bind to actin from an amoeba.

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