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Definition of Momentum

Babylon English

force of movement; product of the mass of a body of matter multiplied by its velocity (Physics, Mechanics); strength or motivation derived from an initial effort
Momentum Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
JM Latin-English Dictionary
N
moment| importance| influence; motion| movement; impulse| effort
Momentum Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
The quantity of motion in a moving body, being always proportioned to the quantity of matter multiplied into the velocity; impetus.
  
(n.)
Essential element, or constituent element.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

momentum
\mo*men"tum\ (?), n.; pl. l. momenta (#), f. momentums (#). [l. see moment.]
1. (mech.) the quantity of motion in a moving body, being always proportioned to the quantity of matter multiplied into the velocity; impetus.
2. essential element, or constituent element. i shall state the several momenta of the distinction in separate propositions. w. hamilton.
momentum
n
1. an impelling force or strength; "the car's momentum carried it off the road" [syn: impulse]


2. the product of a body's mass and its velocity; "the momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities"

for Vocabulary Exams of KPDS, YDS,UDS (in Turkey); and SAT in America
An impetus.
English Phonetics

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WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. an impelling force or strength; "the car's momentum carried it off the road"
(synonym) impulse
(hypernym) force, forcefulness, strength
2. the product of a body's mass and its velocity; "the momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities"
(hypernym) physical property
(hyponym) angular momentum
Momentum Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
Campbell R. Harvey's Hypertextual Finance Glossary
The amount of acceleration of an economic, price, or volume movement. A trader that follows a movement strategy will purchase stocks that have recently risen in price.
Copyright © 2000, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
Company Info: Ticker, Name, Description
MOMENTUM HOLDINGS CORP
Exchange: OTCBB
Not Available
Momentum Business Applications, Inc.
Exchange: Nasdaq
Develops electronic business applications, analytic applications and industry-specific software application products.
Momentum Definition from Government Dictionaries & Glossaries
Rabintex Ballistic Dictionary
Motion impetus.
Momentum Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
General Chemistry Glossary
(p) Momentum is a property that measures the tendency of a moving object to keep moving in the same direction. Increasing the speed of an object increases its momentum, and a heavy object will have more momentum than a lighter one moving at the same speed. For a particle with mass m and velocity v, the momentum of the particle is mv.
WEATHER&METEOROLOGY
The product of the mass and velocity for an object in motion. Momentum can only be changed by the application of an external force, which is expressed by Newton's second law of motion.
Dictionary of Automotive Terms
A measure of a body's motion. It can be calculated from the product of the body's mass and velocity.
ASTRONOMY UNBOUND
The product of the mass of a moving object and its velocity; at relativistic speeds the mass will be greater than its rest mass. Even though a photon has no mass it carries momentum (= hf/c, where h is Planck's constant, f the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation and c is the speed of light.). A photon of visible light carries about 10-27 kg m s-1. This manifests itself as radiation pressure in space.
Momentum Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
In classical mechanics, linear momentum or translational momentum (pl. momenta; SI unit kg m/s, or equivalently, N s) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. For example, a heavy truck moving fast has a large momentum—it takes a large and prolonged force to get the truck up to this speed, and it takes a large and prolonged force to bring it to a stop afterwards. If the truck were lighter, or moving more slowly, then it would have less momentum.

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Momentum Definition from Entertainment & Music Dictionaries & Glossaries
English to Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan
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