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Definition of Mobilization

Babylon English

movement; assembly for action (especially of army reserves); draft; (also mobilisation)
Mobilization Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
The act of mobilizing.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

mobilization
\mob`i*li*za"tion\ (?), n. [f. mobilization.] the act of mobilizing.

WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. act of assembling and putting into readiness for war or other emergency: "mobilization of the troops"
(synonym) mobilisation, militarization, militarisation
(antonym) demobilization, demobilisation
(hypernym) social control
(hyponym) arming, armament, equipping
(derivation) call up, mobilize, mobilise, rally
2. act of marshaling and organizing and making ready for use or action; "mobilization of the country's economic resources"
(synonym) mobilisation
(hypernym) assembly, assemblage, gathering
(hyponym) economic mobilization, economic mobilisation
(derivation) mobilize, mobilise, marshal, summon
Mobilization Definition from Government Dictionaries & Glossaries
DOD Dictionary of Military Terms
1. The act of assembling and organizing national resources to support national objectives in time of war or other emergencies. See also industrial mobilization. 2. The process by which the Armed Forces or part of them are brought to a state of readiness for war or other national emergency. This includes activating all or part of the Reserve Components as well as assembling and organizing personnel, supplies, and materiel. Mobilization of the Armed Forces includes but is not limited to the following categories: a. selective mobilization - Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and/or the President to mobilize Reserve Component units, Individual Ready Reservists, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a domestic emergency that is not the result of an enemy attack. b. partial mobilization - Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress (up to full mobilization) or by the President (not more than 1,000,000 for not more than 24 consecutive months) to mobilize Ready Reserve Component units, individual reservists, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. c. full mobilization - Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and the President to mobilize all Reserve Component units and individuals in the existing approved force structure, as well as all retired military personnel, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. Reserve personnel can be placed on active duty for the duration of the emergency plus six months. d. total mobilization - Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and the President to organize and/or generate additional units or personnel beyond the existing force structure, and the resources needed for their support, to meet the total requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. Also called MOB. (JP 4-05)
  
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Joint Doctrine Division. ( About )
International Relations and Security Acronyms
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Mobilization Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Mobilization is the act of assembling and making both troops and supplies ready for war. The word mobilization was first used, in a military context, in order to describe the preparation of the Russian army during the 1850s and 1860s. Mobilization theories and techniques have continuously changed since then. The opposite of mobilization is demobilization.

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