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Definition of Medieval period

Medieval period Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Official Judaism Glossary
The Medieval Period, for the purposes of this course, begins in the sixth century CE, essentially following the publication of the Babylonian Talmud. Following upon the heals of the Rabbinic Period, it lasted for over a millenium into the eighteenth century. In some european countries, it went on even into the nineteenth century, depending on how long it took the enlightenment and the emancipation to usher in the Modern Period. During this extended time, the Jews never had a country of their own and hence they were always ruled by people of other religions, namely, Christianity and Islam. In Islamic countries, Jews were tolerated and had rights, but were considered second-class citizens. In Christian countries, by comparison, Jews had no defined rights. They were often confined to living in special locations (see, for example, Ghetto), forbidden to own land, and subjected to attacks on individuals and on whole communities. During this time, Traditional Judaism, which was based on the Talmud and the Tanak, helped the Jews survive their lack of power over their own lives. In some countries, Jews took part in and learned from poetic, philosophical, and mystical movements.
Medieval period Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
In European history, the Middle Ages, or Medieval period, lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and merged into the Renaissance and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: Antiquity, Medieval period, and Modern period. The Medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, the High, and the Late Middle Ages.

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