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Definition of Lambrequin

Babylon English Dictionary

medieval helmet protector made of fabric; decorative drapery; decoration at the top of a vase
Lambrequin Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
A piece of ornament drapery or short decorative hanging, pendent from a shelf or from the casing above a window, hiding the curtain fixtures, or the like.
  
(n.)
A leather flap hanging from a cuirass.
  
(n.)
A kind of pendent scarf or covering attached to the helmet, to protect it from wet or heat.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

lambrequin
\lam"bre*quin\ (?), n. [f. cf. lamboys, label.]
1. a kind of pendent scarf or covering attached to the helmet, to protect it from wet or heat.
2. a leather flap hanging from a cuirass.
3. a piece of ornament drapery or short decorative hanging, pendent from a shelf or from the casing above a window, hiding the curtain fixtures, or the like.
lambrequin
n
1. a scarf that covers a knight's helmet
2. short and decorative hanging for a shelf edge or top of a window casing

WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a scarf that covers a knight's helmet
(hypernym) scarf
2. short and decorative hanging for a shelf edge or top of a window casing
(hypernym) hanging, wall hanging
Lambrequin Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
For the rockclimbing move, see Mantle (climbing)
In heraldry, mantling or lambrequin is drapery tied to the helmet above the shield. It forms a backdrop for the shield. In paper heraldry it is a depiction of the protective cloth covering (often of linen) worn by knights from their helmets to stave off the elements, and, secondarily, to decrease the effects of sword-blows against the helmet in battle, from which it is usually shown tattered or cut to shreds; less often it is shown as an intact drape, principally in those cases where a clergyman uses a helmet and mantling (to symbolise that, despite the perhaps contradictory presence of the helmet, the clergyman has not been involved in combat), although this is usually the artist's discretion and done for decorative rather than symbolic reasons.

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