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Definition of Kingdom of god

Kingdom of god Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
hEnglish - advanced version

kingdom of god
n : the domain over which god is spiritually sovereign [syn: kingdom of god ]


kingdom of god
(matt. 6:33; mark 1:14, 15; luke 4:43) = "kingdom of christ" (matt. 13:41; 20:21) = "kingdom of christ and of god" (eph. 5:5) = "kingdom of david" (mark 11:10) = "the kingdom" (matt. 8:12; 13:19) = "kingdom of heaven" (matt. 3:2; 4:17; 13:41), all denote the same thing under different aspects, viz.: (1) christ's mediatorial authority, or his rule on the earth; (2) the blessings and advantages of all kinds that flow from this rule; (3) the subjects of this kingdom taken collectively, or the church.

WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. the domain over which God is spiritually sovereign
(hypernym) domain, demesne, land
Kingdom of god Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
The concept of the kingship of God appears in all Abrahamic religions, where in some cases the terms Kingdom of God and Kingdom of Heaven are also used. The notion of God's kingship goes back to the Hebrew Bible, which refers to "his kingdom" but does not include the term "Kingdom of God".

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Kingdom of god Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
(Matt. 6:33; Mark 1:14, 15; Luke 4:43) = "kingdom of Christ" (Matt. 13:41; 20:21) = "kingdom of Christ and of God" (Eph. 5:5) = "kingdom of David" (Mark 11:10) = "the kingdom" (Matt. 8:12; 13:19) = "kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 3:2; 4:17; 13:41), all denote the same thing under different aspects, viz.: (1) Christ's mediatorial authority, or his rule on the earth; (2) the blessings and advantages of all kinds that flow from this rule; (3) the subjects of this kingdom taken collectively, or the Church.
Rakefet
Kingdom of Heaven, Kingdom of God In the New Testament, used by John the Baptist, Jesus, and St. Paul; it indicates a state of relative spiritual completion and attainment, not merely the afterdeath state of the "righteous" or "saved," as seen in the statement, "the kingdom of God is within you" (Luke 17:21). Blavatsky interprets the answer in the Gospel of the Egyptians as to when the kingdom of heaven will come -- "When the Two has been made One, and the Outward has become as the Inward, and the Male with the Female neither Male nor Female" -- as signifying among other things, 1) the union of lower manas with the higher manas, the self-conscious raising of the personality to the individuality; and 2) the return of humankind to the androgynous state in future root-races. "Thus this Kingdom may be attained by individuals now, and by mankind in Races to come" {BCW 13:48-9; 14:55; ET}.
Official Christianity Glossary for Introduction to Religion
(1) The Kingdom of God was seen by the early church as a future establishment of God's reign on earth, usually with Jesus as king. The first Christians expected this kingdom to come during their lifetime. When this did not happen, the belief was reshaped to point to some unspecified future moment. The Book of Revelation (i.e., the Apocalypse of John), with its notions of the second coming of Christ and the millennium , helped in this process by specifying in symbolic language both the future coming of the Kingdom and the events that would lead up to it. (2) This belief has alternated through Christian history with another concept of the Kingdom of God. This concept makes the kingdom into the institution of the established church. It first came into prominence after Constantine 's triumph made Christianity into the religion of the Roman Empire.