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Definition of Justification

Babylon English Dictionary

something which excuses or defends; vindication, support, defense, explanation, reason; adjustment of words and letters to make them exactly fill a line of type
Justification Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
English-Latin Online Dictionary
purgatio
Theological and Philosophical Biography and Dictionary
See Justification of beliefs, etc
Justification Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
The showing in court of a sufficient lawful reason why a party charged or accused did that for which he is called to answer.
  
(n.)
The act of justifying, or the state of being justified, in respect to God's requirements.
  
(n.)
The act of justifying or the state of being justified; a showing or proving to be just or conformable to law, justice, right, or duty; defense; vindication; support; as, arguments in justification of the prisoner's conduct; his disobedience admits justification.
  
(n.)
Adjustment of type by spacing it so as to make it exactly fill a line, or of a cut so as to hold it in the right place; also, the leads, quads, etc., used for making such adjustment.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

justification
\jus`ti*fi*ca"tion\ (?), n. [l. justificatio: cf. f. justification. see justify.]
1. the act of justifying or the state of being justified; a showing or proving to be just or conformable to law, justice, right, or duty; defense; vindication; support; as, arguments in justification of the prisoner's conduct; his disobedience admits justification. i hope, for my brother's justification, he wrote this but as an essay or taste of my virtue.
2. (law) the showing in court of a sufficient lawful reason why a party charged or accused did that for which he is called to answer.
3. (theol.) the act of justifying, or the state of being justified, in respect to god's requirements. who was delivered for our offenses, and was raised again for our justification. iv. 25. in such righteousness to them by faith imputed, they may find justification toward god, and peace of conscience.
4. (print.) adjustment of type by spacing it so as to make it exactly fill a line, or of a cut so as to hold it in the right place; also, the leads, quads, etc., used for making such adjustment.
justification
n
1. something (such as a fact or circumstance) that shows an action to be reasonable or necessary: "he considered misrule a justification for revolution"
2. a statement in explanation of some action or belief
3. the act of justifying: "the justification of barbarous means by holy ends"- h.j.muller
justification
a forensic term, opposed to condemnation. as regards its nature, it is the judicial act of god, by which he pardons all the sins of those who believe in christ, and accounts, accepts, and treats them as righteous in the eye of the law, i.e., as conformed to all its demands. in addition to the pardon (q.v.) of sin, justification declares that all the claims of the law are satisfied in respect of the justified. it is the act of a judge and not of a sovereign. the law is not relaxed or set aside, but is declared to be fulfilled in the strictest sense; and so the person justified is declared to be entitled to all the advantages and rewards arising from perfect obedience to the law (rom. 5:1-10). it proceeds on the imputing or crediting to the believer by god himself of the perfect righteousness, active and passive, of his representative and surety, jesus christ (rom. 10:3-9). justification is not the forgiveness of a man without righteousness, but a declaration that he possesses a righteousness which perfectly and for ever satisfies the law, namely, christ's righteousness (2 cor. 5:21; rom. 4:6-8). the sole condition on which this righteousness is imputed or credited to the believer is faith in or on the lord jesus christ. faith is called a "condition," not because it possesses any merit, but only because it is the instrument, the only instrument by which the soul appropriates or apprehends christ and his righteousness (rom. 1:17; 3:25, 26; 4:20, 22; phil. 3:8-11; gal. 2:16). the act of faith which thus secures our justification secures also at the same time our sanctification (q.v.); and thus the doctrine of justification by faith does not lead to licentiousness (rom. 6:2-7). good works, while not the ground, are the certain consequence of justification (6:14; 7:6). (see galatians, epistle to.)

for Vocabulary Exams of KPDS, YDS,UDS (in Turkey); and SAT in America
Vindication
Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
fíorú (ráiteas, etc) m.; saoradh (duine) ó chion m.
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Cyfiawnhad = n. justification
Ym = pref. reflects the action expressed by the word to which it is prefixed, on the actor; as LLOSGI, to burn; YMLOSGI, to burn one's self; CYFIAWNAD, justification; YMGYFIAWNAD, self-justification.
It also denotes reciprocity of action; as CYDIO, to take hold of; YMGYDIO, to take hold of each other.
For the meaning of terms with this prefix, not inserted here, see the words from which they are formed: pron. my, me
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. something (such as a fact or circumstance) that shows an action to be reasonable or necessary; "he considered misrule a justification for revolution"
(hypernym) circumstance, condition, consideration
(derivation) apologize, apologise, excuse, justify, rationalize, rationalise
2. a statement in explanation of some action or belief
(hypernym) explanation, account
(hyponym) cause, reason, grounds
(derivation) absolve, justify, free
3. the act of defending or explaining or making excuses for by reasoning; "the justification of barbarous means by holy ends"- H.J.Muller
(hypernym) vindication, exoneration
(derivation) apologize, apologise, excuse, justify, rationalize, rationalise
Justification Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
Telecommunication Standard Terms
See bit stuffing, de-stuffing, justify.
RF Electronics
Process of changing data rate of a digitally coded signal, usually without loss of information, in order to match it to a transmission rate different from its own inherent rate.
Justification Definition from Computer & Internet Dictionaries & Glossaries
JDK Doc(JAVA)
- Static variable in class java.awt.font.TextAttribute 
public static final TextAttribute JUSTIFICATION
Attribute key for the justification of a paragraph.
INTERNET TERMS&ACRONYMSV1.0
The alignment of margins in a field or record on both the right and the left sides or on one side.
Justification Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Justification may refer to:
  • Theory of justification, a part of epistemology that attempts to understand the justification of propositions and beliefs
  • Justification (jurisprudence), defence in a prosecution for a criminal offense
  • Justification (theology), God's act of declaring or making a sinner righteous before God
  • Justification (typesetting), a kind of typographic alignment
  • Formal proof, an object that justifies the validity of a formalized statement
  • Justification may also refer to ad hoc hypotheses and explanations
  • Rationalization (making excuses), a phenomenon in psychology

See more at Wikipedia.org...
© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Justification Definition from Law Dictionaries & Glossaries
The 'Lectric Law Library
The act by which a party accused shows and maintains a good and legal reason in court, why he did the thing he is called upon to answer.

What Acts Are Justifiable.

The acts to be justified are those committed with a warrant, and those committed without a warrant. It is a general rule that a warrant or execution issued by a court having jurisdiction, whether the same be right or wrong, justifies the officer to whom it is directed and who is by law required to execute it, and is a complete justification to the officer for obeying its command. But when the warrant is not merely voidable, but is absolutely void, as for want of jurisdiction in the court which issued it, or by reason of the privilege of the defendant, as in the case of the arrest of an ambassador, who cannot waive his privilege and immunities by submitting to be arrested on such warrant, the officer is no longer justified.

A person may justify many acts, while acting without any authority from a court or magistrate. He may even justifiably take the life of an aggressor, while acting in the defence of himself, his wife, children, and servant, or for the protection of his house, when attacked with a felonious intent, or even for the protection of his personal property.

A man may justify what would otherwise have been a trespass, an entry on the land of another for various purposes; as for example, to demand a debt due to him by the owner of the land to remove chattels which belong to him, but this entry must be peaceable; to exercise an incorporeal right; ask for lodging's at an inn.

It is an ancient principle of the common law that a trespass may be justified in many cases. Thus, a man may enter on the land of another, to kill a fox or otter, which are beasts against the common profit. So, a house may be pulled down if the adjoining one be on fire, to prevent a greater destruction. So, the suburbs of a city may be demolished in time of war, for the good of the commonwealth. So, a man may enter on his neighbor to make a bulwark in defence of the realm. So, a house may be broken to arrest a felon.

In a civil action, a man may justify a libel, or slanderous words, by proving their truth, or because the defendant had a right, upon the particular occasion, either to write and publish the writing, or to utter the words; as when slanderous words are found in a report of a committee of congress or in an indictment, or words of a slanderous nature are uttered in the course of debate in the legislature by a member or at the bar by counsel, when properly instructed by his client on the subject.

In general, justification must be specially pleaded, and it cannot be given in evidence under the plea of the general issue.

When the plea of justification is supported by the evidence, it is a complete bar to the action.
   

This entry contains material from Bouvier's Legal Dictionary, a work published in the 1850's.
Courtesy of the 'Lectric Law Library.
Justification Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
a forensic term, opposed to condemnation. As regards its nature, it is the judicial act of God, by which he pardons all the sins of those who believe in Christ, and accounts, accepts, and treats them as righteous in the eye of the law, i.e., as conformed to all its demands. In addition to the pardon (q.v.) of sin, justification declares that all the claims of the law are satisfied in respect of the justified. It is the act of a judge and not of a sovereign. The law is not relaxed or set aside, but is declared to be fulfilled in the strictest sense; and so the person justified is declared to be entitled to all the advantages and rewards arising from perfect obedience to the law (Rom. 5:1-10). It proceeds on the imputing or crediting to the believer by God himself of the perfect righteousness, active and passive, of his Representative and Surety, Jesus Christ (Rom. 10:3-9). Justification is not the forgiveness of a man without righteousness, but a declaration that he possesses a righteousness which perfectly and for ever satisfies the law, namely, Christ's righteousness (2 Cor. 5:21; Rom. 4:6-8). The sole condition on which this righteousness is imputed or credited to the believer is faith in or on the Lord Jesus Christ. Faith is called a "condition," not because it possesses any merit, but only because it is the instrument, the only instrument by which the soul appropriates or apprehends Christ and his righteousness (Rom. 1:17; 3:25, 26; 4:20, 22; Phil. 3:8-11; Gal. 2:16). The act of faith which thus secures our justification secures also at the same time our sanctification (q.v.); and thus the doctrine of justification by faith does not lead to licentiousness (Rom. 6:2-7). Good works, while not the ground, are the certain consequence of justification (6:14; 7:6). (See GALATIANS, EPISTLE TO.)
Glossary of religious terms
A Christian  term that refers to the forgiveness and total elimination of a believer's sin on the grounds of Jesus' righteousness and shed blood at his crucifixion. An individual is "justified" when "they are brought into right standing and into a right relationship with" God. To most Protestants, this is a direct action initiated by God on the individual; once justified, one is saved forever. To Roman Catholics, it is a byproduct of the sacraments; one loses justification by committing a mortal sin; one regains it through the sacraments.