Babylon 10
The world's best online dictionary

Download it's free

Definition of Heat

Babylon English

become hot; make hot
warmth, high temperature; excitement, passion; early part of a race; state of being prepared for sexual activity (in female animals)
Heat Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
English-Latin Online Dictionary
aestus estus
Heat Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(imp. & p. p.)
Heated; as, the iron though heat red-hot.
  
(n.)
A force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and evaporation, and which, as manifested in fire, the sun's rays, mechanical action, chemical combination, etc., becomes directly known to us through the sense of feeling. In its nature heat is a mode if motion, being in general a form of molecular disturbance or vibration. It was formerly supposed to be a subtile, imponderable fluid, to which was given the name caloric.
  
(n.)
A single complete operation of heating, as at a forge or in a furnace; as, to make a horseshoe in a certain number of heats.
  
(n.)
A violent action unintermitted; a single effort; a single course in a race that consists of two or more courses; as, he won two heats out of three.
  
(n.)
Agitation of mind; inflammation or excitement; exasperation.
  
(n.)
Animation, as in discourse; ardor; fervency.
  
(n.)
Fermentation.
  
(n.)
High temperature, as distinguished from low temperature, or cold; as, the heat of summer and the cold of winter; heat of the skin or body in fever, etc.
  
(n.)
Indication of high temperature; appearance, condition, or color of a body, as indicating its temperature; redness; high color; flush; degree of temperature to which something is heated, as indicated by appearance, condition, or otherwise.
  
(n.)
Sexual excitement in animals.
  
(n.)
The sensation caused by the force or influence of heat when excessive, or above that which is normal to the human body; the bodily feeling experienced on exposure to fire, the sun's rays, etc.; the reverse of cold.
  
(n.)
Utmost violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party.
  
(v. i.)
To grow warm or hot by fermentation, or the development of heat by chemical action; as, green hay heats in a mow, and manure in the dunghill.
  
(v. i.)
To grow warm or hot by the action of fire or friction, etc., or the communication of heat; as, the iron or the water heats slowly.
  
(v. t.)
To excite ardor in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions.
  
(v. t.)
To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish.
  
(v. t.)
To make hot; to communicate heat to, or cause to grow warm; as, to heat an oven or furnace, an iron, or the like.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

heat
\heat\ (?), n. [oe. hete, h?te, as. h&?;tu, h&?;to, fr. hāt hot; akin to ohg. heizi heat, dan. hede, sw. hetta. see hot.]
1. a force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and evaporation, and which, as manifested in fire, the sun's rays, mechanical action, chemical combination, etc., becomes directly known to us through the sense of feeling. in its nature heat is a mode if motion, being in general a form of molecular disturbance or vibration. it was formerly supposed to be a subtile, imponderable fluid, to which was given the name caloric.
note: as affecting the human body, heat produces different sensations, which are called by different names, as heat or sensible heat, warmth, cold, etc., according to its degree or amount relatively to the normal temperature of the body.
2. the sensation caused by the force or influence of heat when excessive, or above that which is normal to the human body; the bodily feeling experienced on exposure to fire, the sun's rays, etc.; the reverse of cold.
3. high temperature, as distinguished from low temperature, or cold; as, the heat of summer and the cold of winter; heat of the skin or body in fever, etc. else how had the world avoided pinching cold and scorching heat!
4. indication of high temperature; appearance, condition, or color of a body, as indicating its temperature; redness; high color; flush; degree of temperature to which something is heated, as indicated by appearance, condition, or otherwise. it has raised heats in their faces. the heats smiths take of their iron are a blood-red heat, a white-flame heat, and a sparking or welding heat.
5. a single complete operation of heating, as at a forge or in a furnace; as, to make a horseshoe in a certain number of heats.
6. a violent action unintermitted; a single effort; a single course in a race that consists of two or more courses; as, he won two heats out of three. many causes for refreshment betwixt the heats. [he] struck off at one heat the matchless tale of "tam o'shanter." c. shairp.
7. utmost violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party. "the heat of their division."
8. agitation of mind; inflammation or excitement; exasperation. "the head and hurry of his rage."
9. animation, as in discourse; ardor; fervency. with all the strength and heat of eloquence.
10. sexual excitement in animals.
11. fermentation.


  similar words(30) 



 capacity for heat 
 heat up 
 radiant heat 
 total heat 
 specific heat of a substance 
 specific heat 
 blood heat 
 white heat 
 red heat 
 latent heat 
 unit of heat 
 dead heat 
 animal heat 
 mechanical equivalent of heat 
 prickly heat 
 heat engine 
 heat energy 
 heat content 
 heat barrier 
 heat producers 
 heat lightning 
 heat lamp 
 atomic heat 
 heat weight 
 turn up the heat 
 heat sink 
 dynamical theory of heat 
 kinetic theory of heat 
 heat rays 
 heat unit 
English Phonetics

www.interactiveselfstudy.com
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Angar = n. receptacle of heat
Angerdd = n. hot steam; heat; strength, force
Annhesog = a. void of sun heat
Brydio = v. to heat; to throb
Crai = n. heat; potency; the heart; the eye of a needle; a. vivid, fervid;
Crasboethi = v. to parch with heat
Crasboethiad = n. a parching, or a drying with heat
Cres = n. a hardening by heat
Diboeth = a. without heat
Diwres = a. without heat
Dyfrydio = v. to heat
Graid = n. sun heat; ardency = a. ardent, vehement
Greiau = n. what gives heat
Gwres = n. heat, warmth
Gwresu = v. to fill with heat
Gwynias = a. of glowing heat
Llosg = n. a burn; heat, inflammation
Poethder = n. hotness, heat
Poethi = v. to heat; to be heated
Poethni = n. hotness, heat
Tes = n. sunshine, warmth, heat
Tesach = n. heat; wantonness
Tesaint = n. a teeming with heat
Tesiad = n. a dispensing of heat
Trachwres = n. extreme heat
Tragwers = n. extreme heat
Tryboethi = v. to heat through
Twym = n. a heat; a flush; a. warm, hot, sultry
Twymo = v. to warm, to heat
Twymyn = n. a heat; a fever
Ulo = v. to damp; to smother; to become close or muggy; to heat with
The Devil's Dictionary
Heat, (n.)

Heat, says Professor Tyndall, is a mode
Of motion, but I know now how he's proving
His point; but this I know -- hot words bestowed
With skill will set the human fist a-moving,
And where it stops the stars burn free and wild.
"Crede expertum" -- I have seen them, child. Gorton Swope
  
The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce, 1911 (About)
Shakespeare Words
of 'to heat,' heated, urgency, desire
Anagram
  hate  thea
Australian Slang
really hot
English Slang Dictionary v1.2
to get mad
Low Life Glossary
1. noun. Intense pressure or pursuit by officers of the law.

2. A police officer.

3. Intoxication.
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature
(synonym) heat energy
(hypernym) energy
(hyponym) geothermal energy
(derivation) hot up, heat up
2. the presence of heat
(synonym) hotness, high temperature
(hypernym) temperature
(hyponym) calefaction, incalescence
(derivation) heat up
3. the sensation caused by heat energy
(synonym) warmth
(hypernym) temperature
(derivation) hot up, heat up
4. intense passion or emotion
(synonym) warmth, passion
(hypernym) emotionality, emotionalism
(derivation) inflame, stir up, wake, ignite, fire up
5. applies to nonhuman mammals: a state or period of heightened sexual arousal and activity
(synonym) estrus, oestrus, rut
(hypernym) physiological state, physiological condition
6. a preliminary race in which the winner advances to a more important race
(hypernym) race
7. utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating"
(synonym) heating system, heating plant, heating
(hypernym) utility
(hyponym) central heating
(part-holonym) building, edifice
(part-meronym) boiler, steam boiler
(derivation) hot up, heat up

Verb
1. make hot or hotter; "heat the soup"
(synonym) heat up
(antonym) cool, chill, cool down
(hypernym) change, alter, modify
(hyponym) toast, crisp
(cause) hot up, heat up
(derivation) warmth
2. provide with heat; "heat the house"
(hypernym) supply, provide, render, furnish
(hyponym) steam-heat
(derivation) heating system, heating plant, heating
3. arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred"
(synonym) inflame, stir up, wake, ignite, fire up
(hypernym) arouse, elicit, enkindle, kindle, evoke, fire, raise, provoke
(hyponym) ferment
(derivation) warmth, passion
4. gain heat or get hot; "The room heated up quickly"
(synonym) hot up, heat up
(antonym) cool, chill, cool down
(hypernym) change state, turn
(hyponym) overheat
(derivation) heating system, heating plant, heating
Heat Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
Glossary of Iron Casting Terms
The entire period of operation of a continuous melting furnace such as a cupola from light-up to finish of melting. One cycle of operation in a batch melting furnace. Also the total metal from one such operation.
Heat Definition from Government Dictionaries & Glossaries
DOD Joint Acronyms and Abbreviations
helicopter external air transport; high explosive antitank
  
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Joint Doctrine Division. ( About )
Military Abbreviations
High Explosive Anti-Tank
International Relations and Security Acronyms
High Explosive Anti-Tank
Rabintex Ballistic Dictionary
Energy transferred through a thermal process.
Heat Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
Phobia
Fear of fire
Fear of heat
Dream Dictionary
To dream that you are oppressed by heat, denotes failure to carry out designs on account of some friend betraying you. Heat is not a very favorable dream.
  
Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or "What's in a dream": a scientific and practical exposition; By Gustavus Hindman, 1910. For the open domain e-text see: Guttenberg Project
Heat Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
General Chemistry Glossary
Compare with work , energy , enthalpy , and temperature .Heat is a transfer of energy that occurs when objects with different temperatures are placed into contact. Heat is a process, not a property of a material.
WEATHER&METEOROLOGY
A form of energy transferred between two systems by virtue of a difference in temperature. The first law of thermodynamics demonstrated that the heat absorbed by a system may be used by the system to do work or to raise its internal energy.
Dictionary of Automotive Terms
That which increases the internal energy of a body. This causes a change in temperature, volume , or state of the body.
Technical English by wpv
Form of energy which acts on substances to raise their temperature; energy associated with random motion of molecules.
Rubber Glossary
(see "Lift")
PETsMART.COM
See Estrus.
ICAO Airport codes
Assiut Egypt
ASTRONOMY UNBOUND
The internal kinetic energy of a body; temperature is its measure
Heat Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
In physics, heating is transfer of energy from a hotter body to a colder one, other than by work or transfer of matter. It occurs spontaneously whenever there is a suitable physical pathway between the bodies. The pathway can be direct, as in conduction and radiation, or indirect, as in convective circulation. Heat is a central concept in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, and is also important in chemistry, engineering, and other disciplines.

See more at Wikipedia.org...
High-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) warheads are made of an explosive shaped charge that uses the Munroe effect to create a very high-velocity partial stream of metal in a state of superplasticity that can punch through solid armor.

See more at Wikipedia.org...
WWE Heat (formerly known as Sunday Night Heat also known as Heat) was a professional wrestling television program produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). Originally produced under the World Wrestling Federation banner (WWF), it aired on USA Network, MTV and Spike TV in the United States, Channel 4, Sky1 & Sky Sports in the United Kingdom and CTV Sportsnet in Canada.

See more at Wikipedia.org...
© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Heat Definition from Sports Dictionaries & Glossaries
CUVC Volleyball Glossary
Hitting power. A player who hits the ball very hard is said to "bring the heat". Similarly, it can be said that a puny attacker "doesn't add much warmth to the offence".
Reprint Courtesy & Copyright © 2001 - 2006, Cambridge University Volleyball Club. Definitions by Richard White.
Heat Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
The Scotch Whisky by SDA v.4.20
Heat, Blended Scotch Whisky
By: Bruce & Co Ltd (Leith, Scotland)
EPA Glossary of Climate Change Terms
Form of kinetic energy that flows from one body to another when there is a temperature difference between the two bodies. Heat always flows spontaneously from a hot sample of matter to a colder sample of matter. This is one way to state the second law of thermodynamics. See temperature.
Provided as a public service by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Reference list click here.
Heat Definition from Entertainment & Music Dictionaries & Glossaries
american horse racing dictionary
1) A race in which more then one running is required to decide the winner. More common in harness racing. 2) A breeding term. See estrus.
English to Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan
falek, falek-tor
English - Klingon
n. tuj
Heat Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
blackness; heat
  
hot; heat; brown
  
anger; heat; a wall
  
the heat, or the wall, of an army
  
heat; the sun
  
heat, or anger, of the Lord
  
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (1869) , by Roswell D. Hitchcock. About
Rakefet
Heat In science heat is a class of effects called thermal, and diagnosed as vibratory affections of the particles of bodies, produced by solar radiation, mechanical means, chemical action, or the flow of electric current. In seeking the unity which may reconcile these diversities, science has agreed to call heat a mode of motion or one of the forms of energy. According to this theory, heat energy and mechanical energy are mutually convertible. Heat in the terms of modern physics cannot be described either as a fluid or as a mode of motion; but like all physical phenomena, whether we call them substantial or dynamic, it is a function of the activities of some substratum whose nature science is still striving to define.
Theosophically, heat is a manifestation of one of seven forces emanating from the fount of cosmic life and manifesting itself by various effects on various planes. It is a form of one of the seven primordial conscious forces emanating from anima mundi, one of the seven sons of fohat, or one of seven radicals -- one aspect of universal motion; in other words, the emanation from a living entity expressing itself on our plane as heat. The forces of physics are manifestations of elementals, which themselves are manifestations of noumena on a still higher plane. Heat is both substantial and energic in character, and we may speak of it as being actually a fluidic emanation from living bodies; although it is equally possible to produce heat in so-called inanimate matter because of the stirring up of the same fluid in these bodies by means of intelligence acting to that end.