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Definition of Gravitational force

Gravitational force Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
hEnglish - advanced version

gravitational force
n : the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--albert einstein [syn: gravity, gravitation, gravitational attraction]



WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "the more remote the body the less the gravity"; "the gravitation between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them"; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--Albert Einstein
(synonym) gravity, gravitation, gravitational attraction
(hypernym) attraction, attractive force
(hyponym) solar gravity
(classification) physics, physical science, natural philosophy
Gravitational force Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Gravitation, or gravity, is a natural phenomenon by which all physical bodies attract each other. It is most commonly recognized and experienced as the agent that gives weight to physical objects, and causes physical objects to fall toward the ground when dropped from a height.

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[File:Newtonslawofgravity.ogg|190px|thumb|Prof. Walter Lewin explains Newton's law of gravitation in MIT course 8.01]ref> ]] Newton's law of universal gravitation states that any two bodies in the universe attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. (Separately it was shown that large spherically symmetrical masses attract and are attracted as if all their mass were concentrated at their centers.) This is a general physical law derived from empirical observations by what Isaac Newton called induction. It is a part of classical mechanics and was formulated in Newton's work Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("the Principia"), first published on 5 July 1687. (When Newton's book was presented in 1686 to the Royal Society, Robert Hooke made a claim that Newton had obtained the inverse square law from him – see History section below.) In modern language, the law states the following:

Assuming SI units, F is measured in newtons (N), m1 and m2 in kilograms (kg), r in meters (m), and the constant G is approximately equal to . The value of the constant G was first accurately determined from the results of the Cavendish experiment conducted by the British scientist Henry Cavendish in 1798, although Cavendish did not himself calculate a numerical value for G. This experiment was also the first test of Newton's theory of gravitation between masses in the laboratory. It took place 111 years after the publication of Newton's Principia and 71 years after Newton's death, so none of Newton's calculations could use the value of G; instead he could only calculate a force relative to another force.

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