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Definition of Fan

Babylon English Dictionary

device that produces currents of air; follower, admirer, supporter
ventilate; move or impel air; blow upon; stir into action as if by fanning (i.e. fire, emotions); spread like a fan; spread out
Fan Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
Glossary of Dance Terminology
Circular motion of the free foot
Fan Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
hEnglish - advanced version



 fan window 
 fan blower 
 fan shell 
 fan cricket 
 sports fan 
 fan out 
 fan light 
 exhaust fan 
 fan wheel 
 to make fan of 
 fan vaulting 
 fan training 
 fan tracery 
 venus`s fan 
The Phrase Finder
Meaning
An uproar caused when a previously secret situation becomes publicly known.
Origin
Originated in the USA in the 1930s.
Meaning
An uproar caused when a previously secret situation becomes publicly known.
Origin
Originated in the USA in the 1930s.
© 2004 The Phrase Finder. Take a look at Phrase Finder’s sister site, the Phrases Thesaurus, a subscription service for professional writers & language lovers.
Irish Gaelic words and phrases
wait, stay, remain
Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
fean
English Phonetics

www.interactiveselfstudy.com
JM Welsh <=> English Dictionary
Ffedonas = n. a screen; a fan
Australian Slang
engage in idle talk
when trouble begins
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. a device for creating a current of air by movement of a surface or surfaces
(hypernym) device
(hyponym) electric fan, blower
(part-holonym) cooling system, engine cooling system
2. an enthusiastic devotee of sports
(synonym) sports fan
(hypernym) enthusiast, partisan, partizan
(hyponym) aficionado
3. an ardent follower and admirer
(synonym) buff, devotee, lover
(hypernym) follower
(hyponym) aerophile
(member-holonym) following, followers

Verb
1. strike out (a batter), (of a pitcher)
(hypernym) strike out
(classification) baseball, baseball game, ball
2. make (an emotion) fiercer; "fan hatred"
(hypernym) intensify, compound, heighten, deepen
3. agitate the air
(hypernym) shake, agitate
(hyponym) winnow
4. separate from chaff; "She stood there winnowing grain all day in the field"
(synonym) winnow
(hypernym) sift, sieve, strain
Fan Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
Dream Dictionary
To see a fan in your dreams, denotes pleasant news and surprises are awaiting you in the near future. For a young woman to dream of fanning herself, or that some one is fanning her, gives promise of a new and pleasing acquaintances; if she loses an old fan, she will find that a warm friend is becoming interested in other women.
  
Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or "What's in a dream": a scientific and practical exposition; By Gustavus Hindman, 1910. For the open domain e-text see: Guttenberg Project
Fan Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
ETSI and 3GPP
Flexible Access Network
Agricultural Glossary/yigini2004
—A low cone of alluvial materials. The central point lies at the mouth of a gully or ravine and the material is spread out onto the adjoining plain.
Dictionary of Automotive Terms
1. A fan is a rotating device with curved blades like a propeller. The primary fan in a vehicle is located behind the radiator . Some electric fans may be placed in front of the radiator . It draws air through the radiator so that the coolant looses its heat through the fins of the radiator. It is especially needed when the vehicle is idling or moving slowly. When the vehicle moves quickly, there may be no need for the fan. In some cases, the fan is automatically disengaged. The fan may be driven by a fan belt driven by the engine, or by electricity independent of the engine itself.
2. Other fans are located throughout the vehicle to push air from one location to another, especially for heating and ventilation .
Fan Definition from Computer & Internet Dictionaries & Glossaries
SAN Acronyms
Fabric Address Notification; keeps the AL_PA and Fabric address when loop re-initializes if the switch supports FAN.
Jargon File
n. Without qualification, indicates a fan of science fiction, especially one who goes to cons and tends to hang out with other fans. Many hackers are fans, so this term has been imported from fannish slang; however, unlike much fannish slang it is recognized by most non-fannish hackers. Among SF fans the plural is correctly `fen', but this usage is not automatic to hackers. "Laura reads the stuff occasionally but isn't really a fan."
Fan Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Fan or FAN may refer to:

Technology
  • Mechanical fan, a machine for producing airflow, often for cooling
    • Computer fan (or CPU Fan), a machine for cooling off the electronics contained within a computer
  • Hand fan, an implement held and waved by hand to move air
  • Future Air Navigation System (or FANS), an air traffic control scheme also known as CNS/ATM

See more at Wikipedia.org...
© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Fan Definition from Sports Dictionaries & Glossaries
Worldgolf
To miss the ball completely
Fan Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
Environmental Engineering (English ver.)
Fixed Account Number
Fan Definition from Entertainment & Music Dictionaries & Glossaries
English to Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan
sovek (cooling device); vaikausu (devotee)
Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan to English
any
Fan Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
a winnowing shovel by which grain was thrown up against the wind that it might be cleansed from broken straw and chaff (Isa. 30:24; Jer. 15:7; Matt. 3:12). (See AGRICULTURE.)
Smith's Bible Dictionary

a winnowing-shovel, with which grain was thrown up against the wind to be cleansed from the chaff and straw. (Isaiah 30:24; Matthew 3:12) A large wooden fork is used at the present day.
  
Smith's Bible Dictionary (1884) , by William Smith. About