Babylon 10
The world's best online dictionary

Download it's free

Definition of Cyclops

Babylon English

one-eyed giant (Greek Mythology)
one-eyed giant (Greek Mythology)
Cyclops Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
JM Latin-English Dictionary
N M
Cyclops; one of the Cyclopes (one-eyed giants of Sicily); (esp. Polyphemus)
Cyclops Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n. sing. & pl.)
One of a race of giants, sons of Neptune and Amphitrite, having but one eye, and that in the middle of the forehead. They were fabled to inhabit Sicily, and to assist in the workshops of Vulcan, under Mt. Etna.
  
(n. sing. & pl.)
A portable forge, used by tinkers, etc.
  
(n. sing. & pl.)
A genus of minute Entomostraca, found both in fresh and salt water. See Copepoda.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

cyclops
\cy"clops\ (s?"kl?ps), n. sing. & pl. [l. cyclops, gr. ky`klwps (strictly round-eyed), pl. ky`klwpes; ky`klos circle + 'w`ps eye.]
1. (gr. myth.) one of a race of giants, sons of neptune and amphitrite, having but one eye, and that in the middle of the forehead. they were fabled to inhabit sicily, and to assist in the workshops of vulcan, under mt. etna.
note: pope, in his translation of the "odyssey," uniformly spells this word cyclop, when used in the singular.
2. (zo?l.) a genus of minute entomostraca, found both in fresh and salt water. see copepoda.
3. a portable forge, used by tinkers, etc.
cyclops
n
1. (greek mythology) one of a race of giants having a single eye in the middle of their forehead [syn: cyclops]


2. minute free-swimming freshwater copepod having a large median eye and pear-shaped body and long antennae used in swimming; important in some food chains and as intermediate hosts of parasitic worms that affect man e.g. guinea worms [syn: water flea]



WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. (Greek mythology) one of a race of giants having a single eye in the middle of their forehead
(hypernym) giant
(classification) Greek mythology

Noun
1. minute free-swimming freshwater copepod having a large median eye and pear-shaped body and long antennae used in swimming; important in some food chains and as intermediate hosts of parasitic worms that affect man e.g. Guinea worms
(synonym) water flea
(hypernym) copepod, copepod crustacean
(member-holonym) genus Cyclops
Cyclops Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
Oceanographic, Meteorologal & Climatologal abbreviations and acronyms
CYCLing Of PhosphoruS in the Mediterranean
Cyclops Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
A cyclops (; ; plural cyclopes ; ), in Greek mythology and later Roman mythology, was a member of a primordial race of giants, each with a single eye in the middle of his forehead. The name is widely thought to mean "round-eyed" or "circle-eyed".

See more at Wikipedia.org...
© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Cyclops Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Rakefet
Cyclops Kyklops (Greek) [from kyklos circle, round + ops eye] Plural cyclopes. Round-eyed giants; Homer locates them in Sicily as a lawless race of giants with one central eye, devouring men and caring naught for Zeus; their chief is Polyphemus. For Hesiod, they are three sons of Heaven and Earth, named Arges, Brontes, and Steropes, titan of flame, thunder, and lightning respectively. Later they were considered assistants of Hephaestus in his workshops under volcanoes and their number was no longer confined to three.
The history of human evolution has passed down to us transfigured by the progressive accretion of myths, so that the name cyclopes was handed down to various owners until it meant merely giants who built vast walls. Hesiod's original three were the last three subraces of the Lemurians, the one eye was the wisdom eye, the other eyes not being fully developed as physical organs until the beginning of the fourth root-race. Odysseus, a fourth-race hero, though he destroys a barbarous race in the interests of culture, nevertheless puts out the third eye. It is an allegory of the passage from a simpler Cyclopean civilization of huge stone buildings to the more sensual civilization of the Atlanteans (SD 2:769). Disciples of the initiates of the fourth root-race were said to hand over divine knowledge to their cyclopes, sons of cycles or of the infinite (SD 1:208), while the cyclopes supposed to have built walls were masons in the sense of initiators (SD 2:345).
to be continue "Cyclops2 "