Babylon 10
The world's best online dictionary

Download it's free

Definition of Conservatism

Babylon English

resistance to change, desire to preserve traditions
Conservatism Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
The disposition and tendency to preserve what is established; opposition to change; the habit of mind; or conduct, of a conservative.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
for Vocabulary Exams of KPDS, YDS,UDS (in Turkey); and SAT in America
Tendency to adhere to the existing order of things.
WordNet 2.0

1. a political or theological orientation advocating the preservation of the best in society and opposing radical changes
(synonym) conservativism
(hypernym) political orientation, ideology, political theory
(hyponym) neoconservativism
Conservatism Definition from Social Science Dictionaries & Glossaries
A Glossary of Political Economy Terms
A general preference for the existing order of society and an opposition to all efforts to bring about rapid or fundamental change in that order. Conservative ideologies characteristically strive to show that existing economic and political inequalities are well justified and that the existing order is about as close as is practically attainable to an ideal order. Conservative ideologies most often base their claims on the teachings of religion and traditional morality and tend to downplay the reliability of purely rational or deductive social theories propounded by secular philosophers, economists, and other social thinkers. The specific content of "conservatism" is highly variable across societies and over time, since the arguments necessary to defend the status quo depend upon what the status quo is in any particular country. Because American political and economic institutions were very heavily influenced by 18th and 19th century liberal thought and because America had essentially no experience of the kind of feudal and aristocratic institutions that persisted for so long in Europe, contemporary American conservatism's content includes a much stronger commitment to free markets, individual rights, and political democracy and much less attachment to hereditary aristocracy and state-support for a particular religion than is characteristic of contemporary European conservatism. In Maddox and Lilie's classification of American political ideologies, a political point of view characterized by relatively high support for activist government intervention to enforce traditional morality or social values coupled with relatively high opposition to activist government when it comes to intervening in economic or business affairs.

[See also: ideology, liberalism, libertarianism, populism]

Conservatism Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Conservatism as a political and social philosophy promotes retaining traditional social institutions in the context of the culture of Western Civilization. A person who follows the philosophies of conservatism is referred to as a traditionalist or conservative typically with regard to the values and social structures before the French Revolution of the 1790s when "liberalism" presented a modern alternative. Some conservatives seek to preserve things as they are, emphasizing stability and continuity, while others, called reactionaries, oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were". The first established use of the term in a political context originated with François-René de Chateaubriand in 1818, during the period of  Bourbon restoration that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution. The term, historically associated with right-wing politics, has since been used to describe a wide range of views. There is no single set of policies that are universally regarded as conservative, because the meaning of conservatism depends on what is considered traditional in a given place and time. Thus conservatives from different parts of the world—each upholding their respective traditions—may disagree on a wide range of issues. Edmund Burke, an 18th-century politician who opposed the French Revolution but supported the American Revolution, is credited as one of the main theorists of conservatism in Great Britain in the 1790s. According to Quintin Hogg, the chairman of the British Conservative Party in 1959, "Conservatism is not so much a philosophy as an attitude, a constant force, performing a timeless function in the development of a free society, and corresponding to a deep and permanent requirement of human nature itself."

See more at
© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Conservatism Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
Social Work in Canada
A political ideology generally characterized by a belief in individualism and minimal government intervention in the economy and society; also a belief in the virtue of the status quo and general acceptance of traditional morality. Similar to liberalism, this ideology believes in the following social values: freedom, individualism and inequality.