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Definition of Camel

Babylon English

large desert animal with a humped back; yellowish-brown color; pontoon (Nautical)
Camel Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
A water-tight structure (as a large box or boxes) used to assist a vessel in passing over a shoal or bar or in navigating shallow water. By admitting water, the camel or camels may be sunk and attached beneath or at the sides of a vessel, and when the water is pumped out the vessel is lifted.
  
(n.)
A large ruminant used in Asia and Africa for carrying burdens and for riding. The camel is remarkable for its ability to go a long time without drinking. Its hoofs are small, and situated at the extremities of the toes, and the weight of the animal rests on the callous. The dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) has one bunch on the back, while the Bactrian camel (C. Bactrianus) has two. The llama, alpaca, and vicu–a, of South America, belong to a related genus (Auchenia).
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

camel
\cam"el\ (kăm"&ebreve;l), n. [oe. camel, chamel, of. camel, chamel, f. chameau l. camelus, fr. gr. ka`mhlos; of semitic origin; cf. heb. gāmāl, ar. jamal. cf. as. camel, fr. l. camelus.]
1. (zo?l.) a large ruminant used in asia and africa for carrying burdens and for riding. the camel is remarkable for its ability to go a long time without drinking. its hoofs are small, and situated at the extremities of the toes, and the weight of the animal rests on the callous. the dromedary (camelus dromedarius) has one bunch on the back, while the bactrian camel (c. bactrianus) has two. the llama, alpaca, and vicu?a, of south america, belong to a related genus (auchenia).
2. (naut.) a water-tight structure (as a large box or boxes) used to assist a vessel in passing over a shoal or bar or in navigating shallow water. by admitting water, the camel or camels may be sunk and attached beneath or at the sides of a vessel, and when the water is pumped out the vessel is lifted.
camel
bird (zo?l.), the ostrich.
camel
locust (zo?l.), the mantis.


  similar words(4) 



 bactrian camel 
 camel-backed 
 camel bird 
 camel locust 
The Phrase Finder
Origin
From the Bible, Mark 10:25.
© 2004 The Phrase Finder. Take a look at Phrase Finder’s sister site, the Phrases Thesaurus, a subscription service for professional writers & language lovers.
Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
cam(h)all m.
The Devil's Dictionary
Camel, (n.)

A quadruped (the "Splaypes humpidorsus") of great value to the show business. There are two kinds of camels -- the camel proper and the camel improper. It is the latter that is always exhibited.
  
The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce, 1911 (About)
Shakespeare Words
derrogatory name for an awkward person.
GLOSSARY OF ESOTERIC WORDS
Cud-chewing mammal used as a draft or saddle animal in desert regions.
EG:Trust in Allah, but tie your camel. -Arabic saying
Australian Slang
(horseracing) unsuccessful jockey
(racing) person of Middle Eastern origin
get me (him etc.) a beer
smb. is basically scum
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. cud-chewing mammal used as a draft or saddle animal in desert regions
(hypernym) even-toed ungulate, artiodactyl, artiodactyl mammal
(hyponym) Arabian camel, dromedary, Camelus dromedarius
(member-holonym) Camelus, genus Camelus
Camel Definition from Government Dictionaries & Glossaries
International Relations and Security Acronyms
Critical Aeronautical Material Equipment List
Camel Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
Hill Associates Acronym List
Call Management Language 
ETSI and 3GPP
Customised Application for Mobile network Enhanced Logic
Telecom Terms
Customized Applications for Mobile networks Enhanced Logic (INAP, VHE),
Call Management Language
Yigal's 3G abbreviations
Customized Applications for Mobile Enhanced Logic
Aircraft Photographic Glossary
Single seat fighting scout of WW1, destroyed 1294 enemy aircraft.

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GSM abbreviations
Customised Application for Mobile network Enhanced Logic
Camel Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
A camel is an even-toed ungulate within the genus Camelus, bearing distinctive fatty deposits known as "humps" on its back. The two surviving species of camel are the dromedary, or one-humped camel (C. dromedarius), which inhabits the Middle East and the Horn of Africa; and the bactrian, or two-humped camel (C. bactrianus), which inhabits Central Asia. Both species have been domesticated; they provide milk, meat, hair for textiles or goods such as felted pouches, and are working animals with tasks ranging from human transport to bearing loads.

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Customised Applications for Mobile networks Enhanced Logic, or CAMEL (ETSI TS 123 078) for short, is a set of standards designed to work on either a GSM core network or  UMTS network. They allow an operator to define services over and above standard GSM services/UMTS services. The CAMEL architecture is based on the Intelligent network (IN) standards, and uses the CAP protocol.

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© This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Camel Definition from Sports Dictionaries & Glossaries
maritime&shipping&trade
Hollow vessel of iron, steel or wood, that is filled with water and sunk under a vessel. When water is pumped out, the buoyancy of camel lifts ship. Usually employed in pairs. Very valuable aid to salvage operations. At one time were usual means of lifting a vessel over a bar or sandbank. Were used in Rotterdam in 1690.
Camel Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
Environmental Engineering (English ver.)
A device used to raise sunken objects, consisting of a hollow structure that is submerged, attached tightly to the object, and pumped free of water. Also referred to as a Caisson.
Camel Definition from Religion & Spirituality Dictionaries & Glossaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary
from the Hebrew gamal, "to repay" or "requite," as the camel does the care of its master. There are two distinct species of camels, having, however, the common characteristics of being "ruminants without horns, without muzzle, with nostrils forming oblique slits, the upper lip divided and separately movable and extensile, the soles of the feet horny, with two toes covered by claws, the limbs long, the abdomen drawn up, while the neck, long and slender, is bent up and down, the reverse of that of a horse, which is arched." (1.) The Bactrian camel is distinguished by two humps. It is a native of the high table-lands of Central Asia. (2.) The Arabian camel or dromedary, from the Greek dromos, "a runner" (Isa. 60:6; Jer. 2:23), has but one hump, and is a native of Western Asia or Africa. The camel was early used both for riding and as a beast of burden (Gen. 24:64; 37:25), and in war (1 Sam. 30:17; Isa. 21:7). Mention is made of the camel among the cattle given by Pharaoh to Abraham (Gen. 12:16). Its flesh was not to be eaten, as it was ranked among unclean animals (Lev. 11:4; Deut. 14:7). Abraham's servant rode on a camel when he went to fetch a wife for Isaac (Gen. 24:10, 11). Jacob had camels as a portion of his wealth (30:43), as Abraham also had (24:35). He sent a present of thirty milch camels to his brother Esau (32:15). It appears to have been little in use among the Jews after the conquest. It is, however, mentioned in the history of David (1 Chr. 27:30), and after the Exile (Ezra 2:67; Neh. 7:69). Camels were much in use among other nations in the East. The queen of Sheba came with a caravan of camels when she came to see the wisdom of Solomon (1 Kings 10:2; 2 Chr. 9:1). Benhadad of Damascus also sent a present to Elisha, "forty camels' burden" (2 Kings 8:9). To show the difficulty in the way of a rich man's entering into the kingdom, our Lord uses the proverbial expression that it was easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle (Matt. 19:24). To strain at (rather, out) a gnat and swallow a camel was also a proverbial expression (Matt. 23:24), used with reference to those who were careful to avoid small faults, and yet did not hesitate to commit the greatest sins. The Jews carefully filtered their wine before drinking it, for fear of swallowing along with it some insect forbidden in the law as unclean, and yet they omitted openly the "weightier matters" of the law. The raiment worn by John the Baptist was made of camel's hair (Matt. 3:4; Mark 1:6), by which he was distinguished from those who resided in royal palaces and wore soft raiment. This was also the case with Elijah (2 Kings 1:8), who is called "a hairy man," from his wearing such raiment. "This is one of the most admirable materials for clothing; it keeps out the heat, cold, and rain." The "sackcloth" so often alluded to (2 Kings 1:8; Isa. 15:3; Zech. 13:4, etc.) was probably made of camel's hair.
Smith's Bible Dictionary

The species of camel which was in common use among the Jews and the heathen nations of Palestine was the Arabian or one-humped camel, Camelus arabicus . The dromedary is a swifter animal than the baggage-camel, and is used chiefly for riding purposes; it is merely a finer breed than the other. The Arabs call it the heirie . The speed, of the dromedary has been greatly exaggerated, the Arabs asserting that it is swifter than the horse. Eight or nine miles an hour is the utmost it is able to perform; this pace, however, it is able to keep up for hours together. The Arabian camel carries about 500 pounds. "The hump on the camel's back is chiefly a store of fat, from which the animal draws as the wants of his system require; and the Arab is careful to see that the hump is in good condition before a long journey. Another interesting adaptation is the thick sole which protects the foot of the camel from the burning sand. The nostrils may be closed by valves against blasts of sand. Most interesting is the provision for drought made by providing the second stomach with great cells in which water is long retained. Sight and smell is exceedingly acute in the camel."-Johnson's Encyc. It is clear from (Genesis 12:16) that camels were early known to the Egyptians. The importance of the camel is shown by (Genesis 24:64; 37:25; Judges 7:12; 1 Samuel 27:9; 1 Kings 19:2; 2 Chronicles 14:15; Job 1:3; Jeremiah 49:29,32) and many other texts. John the Baptist wore a garment made of camel hair, (Matthew 3:4; Mark 1:6) the coarser hairs of the camel; and some have supposed that Elijah was clad in a dress of the same stuff.
  
Smith's Bible Dictionary (1884) , by William Smith. About
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
wares; a camel
  
Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (1869) , by Roswell D. Hitchcock. About