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Definition of Buoyant

Babylon English Dictionary

floating; light, lively; cheerful, gay
Buoyant Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(v. t. & i.)
Light-hearted; vivacious; cheerful; as, a buoyant disposition; buoyant spirits.
  
(v. t. & i.)
Having the quality of rising or floating in a fluid; tending to rise or float; as, iron is buoyant in mercury.
  
(v. t. & i.)
Bearing up, as a fluid; sustaining another body by being specifically heavier.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

buoyant
\buoy"ant\ (&?;), a. [from buoy, v. t. & i.]
1. having the quality of rising or floating in a fluid; tending to rise or float; as, iron is buoyant in mercury. "buoyant on the flood."
2. bearing up, as a fluid; sustaining another body by being specifically heavier. the water under me was buoyant.
3. light-hearted; vivacious; cheerful; as, a buoyant disposition; buoyant spirits. -- buoy"ant*ly, adv.

for Vocabulary Exams of KPDS, YDS,UDS (in Turkey); and SAT in America
Having the power or tendency to float or keep afloat.
Concise English-Irish Dictionary v. 1.1
cheerful: meisneamhail, aerach
WordNet 2.0

Adjective
1. tending to float on a liquid or rise in air or gas; "buoyant balloons"; "buoyant balsawood boats"; "a floaty scarf"
(synonym) floaty
(similar) light
2. characterized by liveliness and light-heartedness; "buoyant spirits"; "his quick wit and chirpy humor"; "looking bright and well and chirpy"; "a perky little widow in her 70s"
(synonym) chirpy, perky
(similar) cheerful
Buoyant Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
In science, buoyancy is an upward force exerted by a fluid that opposes the weight of an immersed object. In a column of fluid, pressure increases with depth as a result of the weight of the overlying fluid. Thus a column of fluid, or an object submerged in the fluid, experiences greater pressure at the bottom of the column than at the top. This difference in pressure results in a net force that tends to accelerate an object upwards. The magnitude of that force is proportional to the difference in the pressure between the top and the bottom of the column, and (as explained by Archimedes' principle) is also equivalent to the weight of the fluid that would otherwise occupy the column, i.e. the displaced fluid. For this reason, an object whose density is greater than that of the fluid in which it is submerged tends to sink. If the object is either less dense than the liquid or is shaped appropriately (as in a boat), the force can keep the object afloat. This can occur only in a reference frame which either has a gravitational field or is accelerating due to a force other than gravity defining a "downward" direction (that is, a non-inertial reference frame). In a situation of fluid statics, the net upward buoyancy force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of fluid displaced by the body.

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Buoyant Definition from Entertainment & Music Dictionaries & Glossaries
English to Federation-Standard Golic Vulcan
abmarkan-, abmarkanik