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Definition of Biological diversity

Babylon English

biodiversity, variation in life forms, diversity in ecosystems species or genetic structure
Biological diversity Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
Sean_Woo's Finance,GIS & Real Estate Glossary
1. variety of different species, also as species diversity
2. genetic variability among individuals within each species, also as genetic diversity
3. variety of ecosystems, also as ecological diversity
Biological diversity Definition from Science & Technology Dictionaries & Glossaries
Bioglossary
Description: the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems.
Source: Convention on Biological Diversity CBD

Description: It appears that the term 'biological diversity' was first defined as including two related concepts, genetic diversity (the amount of genetic variability within species) and ecological diversity (the number of species in a community of organisms) by Norse and McManus (1980). There are at least 25 more definitions of biological diversity. The one given on top is the definition used in the Convention text.
Source: OTA, 1987

Description: The variety and variability among living organisms and the ecological complexes in which they occur. Diversity can be defined as the number of different items and their relative frequency. For biological diversity, these items are organized at many levels, ranging from complete ecosystems to the chemical structures that are the molecular basis of heredity. Thus, the term encompasses different ecosystems, species, genes, and their relative abundance.
Source: Reid & Miller, 1989

Description: The variety of the world's organisms, including their genetic diversity and the assemblages they form. It is the blanket term for the natural biological wealth that undergirds human life and well-being. The breadth of the concept reflects the interrelatedness of genes, species and ecosystems.
Source: AID, 1989

Description: the wealth of life on earth including the millions of plants, animals, and micro-organisms as well as the genetic information they contain and the ecosystems that they create.
Source: U.S. Forest Service, 1990

Description: The variety of life and its processes.
Source: McNeely et al., 1990

Description: encompasses all species of plants, animals, and microorganisms and the ecosystems and ecological processes of which they are parts.
Source: EPA, 1990

Description: It is an umbrella term for the degree of nature's variety, including both the number and frequency of ecosystems, species, or genes in a given assemblage.
Source: FAO, 1990

Description: The variety of life on all levels of organization, represented by the number and relative frequencies of items (genes, organisms and ecosystems.
Source: McAllister, 1991

Description: The variety of genes, genotypes and genepools and their relatinships with the environment at molecular, population, species and ecosystem levels.
Source: Pending legislation, U.S.Congres 1991

Description: The genetic, taxonomic and ecosystem variety in living organisms of a given area, environment, ecosystem or the whole planet.
Source: Environmental Law Institute, Fischman, 1991

Description: The full range of variety and variability within and among living organisms and the ecological complexes in which they occur; encompasses ecosystems or community diversity, species diversity and genetic diversity.
Source: Keystone Dialogue, 1991

Description: Those environmental goals that go beyond human health concerns.
Source: Specialized encyclopedia and dictionaries

Description: The variety of life and its processes. It includes the variety of living organisms, the genetic differences among them, and the comunities and ecosystems in which they occur.
Source: Specialized encyclopedia and dictionaries

Description: The variety and variability of all animals, plants and micro-organisms on earth, - can be considered at three levels - genetic diversity (variability within species), species diversity, and habitat diversity.
Source: Overseas Development Administration, 1991).
© European Communities, 1995-2004
Fishery Glossary
The variety and variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems. Diversity indices are measures of richness (the number of species in a system); and to some extent, evenness (variances of species' local abundance). They are therefore indifferent to species substitutions which may, however, reflect ecosystem stresses (such as those due to high fishing intensity). (FAO, 1997).

ncludes genetic diversity (within species), species diversity (within ecosystems) and ecosystem diversity. Diversity indices measure the richness (the number and relative numeric abundance) of species in a system, and the connections between them but are indifferent to species substitution, which may, however, reflect ecosystem stress (such as those due to high fishing intensity). See: Biodiversity
FAO
Glossary Of Geography
A concept recognizing the variety of life forms in an area of the Earth and the ecological interdependence of these life forms.
Biological diversity Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
Biodiversity is the degree of variation of life. This can refer to genetic variation, species variation, or ecosystem variation within an area, biome, or planet. Terrestrial biodiversity tends to be highest at low latitudes near the equator, which seems to be the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity. Marine biodiversity tends to be highest along coasts in the Western Pacific, where sea surface temperature is highest and in mid-latitudinal band in all oceans. Biodiversity generally tends to cluster in hotspots, and has been increasing through time but will be likely to slow in the future.

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Biological diversity Definition from Society & Culture Dictionaries & Glossaries
Environmental Engineering (English ver.)
The number and kinds of organisms per unit area of volume; the composition of species in a given area at a given time.